Tactical Stuff

How To Create a Link-Up Plan for Your Family and Loved Ones | ITS Tactical »

Planning is probably the most important action you can take towards lowering your stress level and increasing your survivability. Even if you don’t suddenly find yourself being shot at, having a plan to link back up with your loved ones is very important. My family has had to do this on more than one occasion to corral children. First and foremost, keep it simple; “meet at this location, at this time.”

A major mistake is what to do if you’re at the predetermined location, or rally point, but no one else has arrived. Now what? You need to have a condition, something like “wait five minutes, then move to this location.” There are actually a lot of reasons why someone might not have been able to make it to the rally point, such as having to cross a major danger area, like the attack site, that didn’t exist beforehand.

If members of your group, or even you yourself, don’t make it to the rally point by the given time, the next step is to fall back to a secondary rally point. The objective with each successive bounding action to the next rally point, is to ensure you’re moving closer to your escape with each movement. The predetermined time limits give you and the rest of your group the opportunity to link up during a fluid and chaotic situation. It doesn’t hurt to even rehearse this plan at a local mall or school event, just make sure everyone knows it’s a drill.

Calling out for a logo design

Within the Red Team at the core of the Digital Ops Group there is a smaller team. We do very specific projects that go beyond Red Teaming.

This team was formed even before the Red Team was active and it does not have an official logo or callsign. We want to change that.
So, I want to run a contest here, much like I did when I was looking for a good logo for the Red Team (done by Jered). Readers can send their ideas for a logo. The winner gets a patch with the logo they had helped design, a Red Teams patch and if we are in your area the chance to go on a recon mission with the team.

The logo will be used on different things, from a patch to a letterhead to a report to a website… The simpler the logo, the better it will be in adapting to the different backgrounds. When thinking and then designing the possible logo please ask yourself:

  • Is the logo legible? Will the logo standout on a dark background? What about light? On a business card? Try to keep the design to a minimum set of objects. Simple is better. Too much stuff on the logo and the meaning will get lost in the noise.
  • Is the logo scalable? Will the logo (and its details) remain legible when you shrink it to be used as an icon? Will it look ok when used full size on a web page?
  • Is it functional? Finally, is the logo a functional logo? Again, in order to keep the logo legible and scalable it must be simple. Having little icons inside the main logo will work on a full size, maybe, but what about smaller sizes? Are those little details getting lost because there are so many of them?

A few guidelines:

  • the logo can include the original Red Teams logo, however a new design is encouranged.
  • it has to be sterile - no text - but convey the idea.
  • no frame is needed on the logo - it must be able to fit a square patch, a circular logo, etc.

A little more about the small team: The team performs both physical and digital deep recon. This includes information gathering prior to an operation or project (the team’s main purpose), digital disruption operations and offensive digital warfare. It also performs phyical security disruption when called upon this. Essentially anything that might create problems for the target.

Please send your designs to redteamsblog@gmail.com

Have fun!


  I’ve spent many years in places where having a “go-bag” packed was a standard operating procedure for every team member. And while in those particular places my go-bag did normally consist of a lot more things that go “Boom,” the principle is the same everywhere – Light is right, be versatile, and expect the worse. My GR0 is a perfect fit.


Cadre Devin Bug-Out Bag

I’ve spent many years in places where having a “go-bag” packed was a standard operating procedure for every team member. And while in those particular places my go-bag did normally consist of a lot more things that go “Boom,” the principle is the same everywhere – Light is right, be versatile, and expect the worse. My GR0 is a perfect fit.

Cadre Devin Bug-Out Bag